Climate change negotiators from around the world will descend on Paris at the end of November.

Climate change negotiators from around the world will descend on Paris at the end of November.

Cause for climate optimism

International climate change agreements have been the political hot potato in recent years but things are looking more positive for a global meeting in Paris in November, as CLARE de CASTELLA reports.

When presidents, prime ministers and diplomats descend on Paris in late November, they will discuss a life-changing matter for billions around the world.

The two-week-long United Nations Climate Change Conference aims to achieve a legally binding agreement that will combat climate change and boost a transition towards low-carbon economies. 

Pressure is on to agree to a settlement that will set targets for countries beyond 2020 at a time where many are wavering on wholescale global action.

A requirement for consensus from every country in the world makes agreeing to anything exceptionally challenging, even without the highly contentious nature of climate policy.    

It's also highly unlikely that the commitments reached in Paris will be enough to meet the objective of limiting global temperature increase to two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. 

Despite this, there is cause for optimism.

According to Associate Professor Frank Jotzo, from the Crawford School of Public Policy, Paris 2015 is looking more promising than the Copenhagen summit in 2009.