Professor Adrian Manning and ACT Minister for Territory and Municipal Services Meegan Fitzharris launch the eastern quolls at Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary. Photo by Stuart Hay.

Professor Adrian Manning and ACT Minister for Territory and Municipal Services Meegan Fitzharris launch the eastern quolls at Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary. Photo by Stuart Hay.

Quolls reintroduced after extinction

The eastern quoll is making a comeback on mainland Australia thanks to ANU researchers.

The eastern quoll is making a comeback on mainland Australia thanks to ANU researchers.

Professor Adrian Manning is leading a team of scientists that has released a new generation of wild eastern quolls from Tasmania into the Mulligans Flat Woodland Sanctuary in Gungahlin, on the northern edge of Canberra.

The eastern quoll, a small carnivorous marsupial, was once widespread in south-eastern Australia. Its extinction can be attributed to habitat loss, foxes and cats, disease, accidental poisoning and deliberate persecution by humans.

"This is the first translocation of wild eastern quolls directly into a free-ranging situation on the Australian mainland," says Manning, from the ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society.

"Our aim is not just to establish a healthy and diverse population of eastern quolls but also undertake critical research to understand the best way to introduce the species to improve success in future reintroductions on the mainland."

The researchers also reintroduced bettongs into mainland Australia for the first time in 50 years.

Watch Manning talk about the reintroduction of quolls in the video below.