Strategic studies expert Hugh White argues that the AUKUS submarines arrangement is a deeply flawed deal that ties Australia to the United States in the event of a major armed conflict in Asia.

Are nuclear-powered submarines the most cost-effective and strategically sound option for Australia?

Is Australia paying for the Virginia-class submarines with a portion of its sovereignty as well as a very large sum of money?

And is the Australian government basing its decision-making on flawed assumptions about the United States’ ongoing pre-eminence in Asia?

On this episode of Democracy Sausage, Emeritus Professor Hugh White from The Australian National University (ANU) discusses the AUKUS deal with Professor Mark Kenny.

Hugh White is an Emeritus Professor of Strategic Studies at ANU College of Asia and the Pacific.

Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the University after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and The Canberra Times.

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on Acast, Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d love to hear your feedback on this series, so send in your questions, comments or suggestions for future episodes to democracysausage@anu.edu.au.

This podcast is produced by The Australian National University.

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