On this episode of Democracy Sausage, former Chair of the Australian Republican Movement Greg Barns joins Mark Kenny to discuss the Voice referendum and the challenges of running a ‘yes’ campaign.

What lessons can the ‘yes’ campaign in the upcoming Voice to Parliament referendum learn from the failed republican campaign in 1999?

How much is too much when it comes to detail ahead of the vote? And how significant is it that Anthony Albanese and the premiers are supportive of the ‘yes’ vote this time, whereas former prime minister John Howard was staunchly opposed to Australia becoming a republic?

Greg Barns SC shares his campaign experience as a former head of the Australian Republican Movement (ARM) with Professor Mark Kenny on this episode of Democracy Sausage.

Greg Barns SC is a barrister at Republic Chambers. He was the political campaign director for the ARM ahead of the 1999 republic referendum, before taking over as Chair in 2000.

Mark Kenny is a Professor at the ANU Australian Studies Institute. He came to the University after a high-profile journalistic career including six years as chief political correspondent and national affairs editor for The Sydney Morning HeraldThe Age and The Canberra Times.

Democracy Sausage with Mark Kenny is available on AcastApple PodcastsSpotifyGoogle Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts.

This podcast is produced by The Australian National University.

Top image: Dan Breckwoldt/Shutterstock.com

You may also like

Article Card Image

Democracy Sausage: Australia’s big chance with Jim Chalmers

Treasurer of Australia Jim Chalmers joins Mark Kenny and Marija Taflaga to discuss the future of Australia’s economy and society.

Article Card Image

Rentals are grim and expensive. Should young people squat instead?

In this age of cozzie livs, TikToker Purple Pingers is offering Gen Z unconventional housing advice.

Article Card Image

It takes a village: why resettling refugees should be a community effort

Australia is seeking to resettle more refugees through new initiatives. But how does this benefit our nation, and regional areas in particular?

Subscribe to ANU Reporter